Tag: film

#NoFilter: The best 26 photos from the first 6 months of my 365 project

 

The first six months of my photo project have changed the way I approach photography, both technically and artistically. But there’s more time to talk about that in the next few months. For now, let’s just all enjoy a bunch of photos from 2016.

For those of you just joining me, a quick recap: I’m shooting one photo a day on film. The goal is to photograph my life experiencing Reno and to get the photos displayed in a gallery at the end of it. The project started July 1, 2016 and will end June 30, 2017. Here’s a link to the #NoFilter blog tag to read more.

There are only 26 out of 216 pictures here. Think of what you’re missing out on.

Best of 2016

Photo by Mike Higdon.

#NoFilter: On photography’s metaphysical relationship between time and shape

In November, a new photographic theme emerged: repeated shapes and revisited narratives. In November, I changed my approach and it illuminated new ways to capture images. But I couldn’t have done that without October. November marks the fifth month of my 365 photo a day on film project that started July 1. On June 30, 2017, I will take my last photo.… Read more →

Illuminati Ball on black and white film

I spend so much time in a digital world, particularly in my job at Swift Communications managing technology, that sometimes it feels good to step into another world. For the first Reno Illuminati Ball, I brought my Minolta X-570 film camera to Reno Provisions to shoot the event, for myself, on black and white film.

I wanted to capture the candid, up-close shots of people’s faces or in this case, their masked faces. I particularly love the shots of people breaking out of character to check their smartphones. It kind of proves the point I was trying to make by bringing an analog camera. The best irony is that I attended an event hosted by Reno Instagrammies and used the slowest form of photography possible. It took three weeks to receive the developed prints.

The event environment and camera presented some interesting challenges. I knew the event would be incredibly dark and the costumes colorful. Nonetheless, I chose the black and white film for two reasons, both practical and accidental. Practically, I wanted to eliminate the distraction of color and focus on faces. Accidentally, Gordon’s Photo Store only had 3200 ISO film in black and white and not color.

Another challenge came from the camera and flash combo. The camera has an internal light meter, just like modern DSLRs, and allows you to set the film up to 3200 ISO. However, the flash meter only meters up to 1000 ISO. This meant the two devices wouldn’t communicate with each other very well. Nonetheless, I shot wide open on a 50mm f/1.7 lens, set the flash to auto distance, pointed it at the ceiling and hoped for the best.

I really enjoyed what I got. The scans, unfortunately, are pretty low res and add a lot more grain to the digital images than what appears on the nice, creamy prints.